Reviews

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  • John Fordham, "Mingus Big Band, Ronnie Scott's, London," Guardian (UK), March 13, 2004: "Trumpeter Kenny Rampton's bebop break on Wednesday Night Prayer meeting, however, was the improvisation of the set - precise, beautifully constructed, rhythmically unerring and full of fresh phrasing."
  • Robin James, "Spirit of Mingus Soars With His 'Ghost Band,'" Saint Paul Pioneer Press, October 30, 2003: "Handy told the audience to 'Shout if you feel like shouting.' The shouting began with bassist Vicente Archer's opening cadenza of 'Haitian Fight Song,' which led to trumpeter Kenny Rampton's outstanding solo on 'Passion of a Woman Loved.'"
  • Jack Massarik, "Charlie's Angels Stay True to Tradition," Evening Standard (London), June 26, 2003: "Listening to the Mingus band with Sue Mingus sitting in the next seat (a totally unplanned happenstance) is an experience worth sharing. ... 'Fables Of Faubus,' that magnificent debunking of a racist Arkansas governor, featured trumpeter Kenny Rampton in fluent form..."
  • Don Heckman, "Fitting Tributes to an Enigmatic Talent," Los Angeles Times, April 7, 2002: "Credit also goes to the Mingus Big Band's brilliant musicians, especially alto saxophonist Alex Foster, trombonists Conrad Herwig and Ku-umba Frank Lacy, trumpeters Kenny Rampton and Alex Sipiagin, and [Ronnie] Cuber, all of whom played important roles in bringing a gripping program to life."
  • "Soloists Breathe Freely," The Age (Melbourne, Australia), January 28, 2002: "There were striking solos from almost every member of the band, including an ecstatic, swirling statement from tenor saxophonist John Stubblefield that maintained itself over an entire chorus, and a casually virtuosic stint from trumpeter Kenny Rampton, who neatly negotiated the sudden shifts in mood and tempo that [bassist Boris] Kozlov and drummer Jonathan Blake cooked up beneath him.
  • Jack Massarik, "Doctor Lonnie Steals the Show," Evening Standard (London), November 2, 2000, review of concert with Jimmy McGriff and Lonnie Smith at Ronnie Scott's Club: "Rampton, a shadowy, barrel-chested figure poised downstage in a Blues Brothers trilby and shades, took some fine trumpet solos, full of growls and half-valve effects. On the ballads his quiet, furry sound evoked memories of the great Lee Morgan. No question, this Rampton could become a blues institution."
  • "Foster Inspires Swirling Head of Steam: Mingus Big Band," Manchester Evening News (UK), July 22, 2000: "The outfit was strong on soloists, with Kenny Rampton reaching inspired heights in Fables Of Faubus, Mingus's vociferous anti-racist piece, in which the trumpeter used his technical and improvisatory talents to create a moving amalgam of melancholy and acerbity."
  • Ken White, "Around the Horn: Kenny Rampton's Trumpet Playing Has Taken Him Far and Wide," Las Vegas Review-Journal, March 17, 2000.
  • Ben Ratliff, "A Premiere (Cut Short) And a Bit of History," New York Times, September 4, 1996: The Mingus Big Band "was formed to show the beauty of Mingus's tussling, multi-layered charts, where mottled brass, shifting tempo and sweet blues lyricism are all of a piece. But it has also become a great solo-spotlight group for New York's unsung jazz talent, and through 'Reincarnation of a Lovebird,' 'Gunslinging Bird' and others, it gave concise space to various styles: Chris Potter's mercurial be-bop classicism on alto saxophone, Frank Lacy's wild-card trombone whinnying and Kenny Rampton's smooth, cool trumpet inventions."
  • Ben Ratliff, "Prodding His Big Band Into Ever Hotter Rhythms," New York Times, July 26, 1996 (review of performance at Smalls in Greenwich Village with Jason Lindner): "Kenny Rampton's trumpet solos alternated lancing shouts and sleek melodic improvising."
  • Keith Bruce, "Memorable Coup Provides Storming Finale," The Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), July 10, 1995 (review of performance with the Mingus Big Band): "Trumpeter Kenny Rampton and pianist Kenny Drew Jr. also won loud cheers at the end of the night for their solo work on Invisible Lady and elsewhere."